Fritz Henle and Berenice Abbott. Paris – New York

& Arnold Newman. Portraits

EXHIBITION Jun 14 — Aug 30, 2008

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

New York bei Nacht - 1945 als die Lichter wieder angingen, 1945

gelatin silver print, printed later

23,5 x 22,8 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

New York at Night. Empire State Building, 350 Fifth Avenue, West Side, 34th and 33rd Streets (General View North), Manhattan, 1932

gelatin silver print, printed later, mounted

34 x 26,4 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

New York at Night III, 1945

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1945

ca. 30 x 40 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

The Old Man waiting (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1950

26,9 x 32,8 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Blossom Restaurant, New York, 1935

gelatin silver print, printed later

26,6 x 34 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Priest on Montmartre (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1958

27,4 x 34,8 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Stanton Street, #328-344, New York, 1937

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1937

19,1 x 24,3 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Yuban Warehouse, New York, 1936

gelatin silver print, printed later

38,2 x 48,6 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Fifth Avenue Houses, New York, 1936

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1936

19 x 24,2 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898-1991)

"Radio Row", Cortlandt Street Manhatten, April 8, 1936

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1936

24,8 x 20 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Gunsmith And Police Station, New York, 1937

gelatin silver print, printed later

26,1 x 33,8 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Heymann's Butcher Shop, New York, 1938

gelatin silver print, printed c. 1950s

19,1 x 24,2 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Street Dancing (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1950

26,9 x 27,1 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Fishermen on the Seine (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1950

30,8 x 26,2 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Two Ladies Gossiping (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1950

33,5 x 27,3 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Young Woman with the Noon Loaf of Bread (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1945

46 x 38 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Sunday Morning St. Cyr Cadets (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1950

32,8 x 27 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Parisienne with her pet (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1950

30,2 x 25,8 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Races at Longchamps (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1950

33,6 x 27,2 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Broadway & Rector From Above, New York, 1935

gelatin silver print, printed later

32,3 x 25,1 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Flatiron Building, New York, 1938

gelatin silver print, printed later

32,3 x 25,1 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Manhattan Bridge Walkway, New York, ca. 1936

gelatin silver print, printed later

48 x 38,5 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Broadway To The Battery, New York (variant), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed later

34 x 25,6 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Columbus Circle #3, New York, 1936

gelatin silver print, printed later

32,8 x 27 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Father Duffy Statue, Times Square, New York, ca. 1936

gelatin silver print, printed later

33 x 26,2 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

BERENICE ABBOTT (1898–1991)

Exchange Place, New York, 1932

gelatin silver print, printed later

48,9 x 13,4 cm

© Berenice Abbott Archive / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993)

Café on Champs Élysées (Paris), 1938

gelatin silver print, printed 1945

39,8 x 47,9 cm

© The Fritz Henle Estate / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Igor Stravinsky, New York City, 1946

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1946

18,2 x 34,5 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Pablo Picasso , Vallauris, France, 1954

gelatin silver print, printed later

32,2 x 25 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Francis Bacon, London, 1975

gelatin silver print, printed later

33,2 x 22,5 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Alfried Krupp, Essen, 1963

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1963

32,2 x 22,7 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Robert Oppenheimer, Berkeley, California, ca. 1948

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1948

27,8 x 22,2 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

I.M. Pei, New York City, 1967

gelatin silver print, printed ca. 1967

31 x 25,5 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

ARNOLD NEWMAN (1918–2006)

Jean Arp, New York City, 1949

gelatin silver print, mounted, printed later

34,6 x 25,3 cm

© Estate of the Artist / Courtesy Kicken Berlin

With the exhibition FRITZ HENLE and BERENICE ABBOTT. Paris – New York, KICKEN BERLIN presents two photographers and their visual impressions of the cities whose formative influence on the history of 20 century art is undeniable: Paris, the heart of the artistic avantgarde in the 1920’s, and New York, the Modernist Metropolis and a refuge for numerous artists fleeing Europe to escape fascism and WW II. In 1921, the year that Paris reached its peak population of 3 million residents and the same year that MAN RAY entered Europe, BERNICE ABBOTT (1898–1991) came by ship from America to Europe. Paris enchanted her so much that she remained there until 1929, adding an ‘e’ to her forename to make it sound more French. MAN RAY hired the young artist as an assistant for his portrait studio, primarily because she "knew nothing about photography". Soon enough however, she became competition and opened a studio of her own. As a representative of a new Modernist School, she rejected the tenets of pictorialism and its efforts to make photography more painterly, to focus on a documentary approach towards photographing urban reality. EUGÈNE ATGET, who delighted the Surrealists with his mysteriously subtle images of Paris, was BERENICE ABBOTT’s cherished role model. Thanks to her singularly dedicated efforts, Atget’s contribution to photography was rescued from oblivion. When the American returned to New York in 1929, the city had changed by economic crisis: the prosperous 1920’s had created a skyscraper building boom, but after the stock exchange crashed in 1929 unemployment and poverty spread. BERENICE ABBOTT had then found her mission: "to do in Manhattan what Atget did in Paris". She delved into a unique New York documentation project. Between 1935–1938 she made hundreds of photographs of the enormous city, of which she published 305 in a book entitled Changing New York. Her project was financed by the artist program (FAP – Federal Art Project) created under Franklin D. Roosevelt’s newly established WPA – Works Progress Administration. She was also enthusiastically supported by the Museum of the City of New York. BERENICE ABBOTT’s vision of New York is not sentimental. She worked with a chronicler’s eye, using the camera to preserve scenes of the city whilst simultaneously creating impressive images of that era’s rhythms. Although she was not without a fear of heights, Abbott took pictures from dizzying perspectives. She also photographed skyscrapers tilting into the sky from the darkness of the urban canyon. She weaves the steel construction of the Manhattan Bridge into a modern, angular spider’s web of technologic devotion. Other motifs include photographs of building entrances and shop windows displays seen in the poorer sections of the Lower East Side – such as a barber waiting for paying customers.
FRITZ HENLE (1909–1993) studied photography under Hanna Seewald at the Bayerische Lehranstalt für Lichtbildwesen (Bavarian State Academy of Photography) and received a certificate of honor. After graduation, he became a photo-assistant in Florence and traveled extensively throughout the Mediterranean, India, China, Japan and Korea, and later to Canada und Mexico, where he photographed Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. In 1936, FRITZ HENLE, from a paternal lineage Jewish family, reached New York and soon began working for the magazines Fortune and Time Life. In 1938 he worked in Paris and although the resulting photographs were originally rejected, they were rediscovered by the New York Times, who published them six years later. Alexei Brodovitch, the legendary art director at Harper's Bazaar, also published a monograph of Henle’s Paris work. In spite of the wide-ranging nature of his oeuvre, which includes society portraits, fashion photography, industrial studies, as well as military stagings, Henle, known as Mr. Rollei (his camera of choice), considered himself, above all, to be a travel photographer. An observer, this flaneur with a camera captured the discreet moments of everyday life, including genre images of people and street scenes. In New York, however, he was fascinated by the neon signs and skyscrapers, and became inspired to work in new, experimental ways. His photograph of the RCA-Buildings (Radio Corporation of America) - the highest building of the Rockefeller Center in Manhattan – depicts a dizzying swirl of city lights in the manner of astronomic images of comets (New York bei Nacht – 1945 als die Lichter wieder angingen). His photographs express a faith related to American citizenship he had recently acquired as well as hope for the new world and the ending of the war in Europe.
American ARNOLD NEWMAN’s (1918–2006) portrait photography is a virtual Who's Who of the Twentieth Century. Creative genuises and intellectuals – from Arthur Miller to Frank Lloyd Wright, Pablo Picasso and Jackson Pollock to Andy Warhol – consented to portraits, as did statesmen, cardinals and financial and business giants such as Rupert Murdoch and Alfried Krupp. Newman worked for magazines such as Life, Holiday, Look, Vanity Fair, Scientific American, Haarper's Bazaar among others, taking portraits of luminaries including Lyndon B. Johnson and Bill Clinton, Konrad Adenauer, Shimon Peres, Yassir Arafat and Benjamin Netanjahu. ARNOLD NEWMANs photographs set new standards of iconography in 20th century portrait photography. Newman, who portrayed his subjects in carefully arranged, real-life settings, is considered the originator of the Environmental Portrait, images that – as a modern variant of Baroque portraiture – simultaneously become character studies. Especially impressive in this respect is the portrait of Alfried Krupp, the industrial magnate who was convicted for Nazi war crimes. Shown in his steelworks in Essen, this is not only the portrait of a controversial personage, it also forges an image of the turbulent history of the 20th century.